#AnswerMyCall Podcast for Parents of Teens

In July, my colleague Rujuta Chincholkar-Mandelia and I started a podcast called #AnswerMyCall for parents of teens. Our first season’s theme was “starting difficult conversations” and we recorded episodes about psychiatric medications for teens, boundaries, food/mood/nutrition/diet culture, and sex, to name a few. The podcast is conversational in nature with few “should dos” and manyContinue reading “#AnswerMyCall Podcast for Parents of Teens”

A Note of Hope for the Single Folks

This personal tale is meant to instill audacious hope in those of you longing for a partner. Over the years in my most pleading prayers, I’d ask for a partner. But, careful not to be greedy or ungrateful, these prayers were modest and meek. “If I could just meet a *decent* guy. He doesn’t haveContinue reading “A Note of Hope for the Single Folks”

The Freedom of Community

In community, we share the burden of life. We share joys and we share trials. When we are committed to others outside of ourselves and our nuclear families, life becomes more complex, but enriched. At times you may feel burdened by your community. You wanted to go to the pool today, but a close friendContinue reading “The Freedom of Community”

“I Regret Nothing”

“Live life with no regrets.” “Regret is a form of punishment itself.” “In the end, we only regret the chances we didn’t take.” “No regrets in life, just lessons learned.” “Appreciate everything, regret nothing.” “Regret” has become a dirty word in our culture, or at least in my generation. To look back and regret poorContinue reading ““I Regret Nothing””

“Don’t Send Me Flowers When I’m Dead”: The Gift of a Living Eulogy

In 2003, when I was 23 years old and my Nana was 79, I wrote a humorous piece about her that I titled, “Nana Banana.” Half-ode, half-roast, it served as a living eulogy to honor one of the women who raised me. Nan talked about death a lot. It was alarming to me as aContinue reading ““Don’t Send Me Flowers When I’m Dead”: The Gift of a Living Eulogy”

What Are the Stages of Grief?

The “Stages of Grief” that people refer to often are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance. These stages, however, were never meant to describe the process of grief after a death. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, the psychiatrist who proposed those stages in her 1969 book “On Death and Dying” was studying the processes of terminally ill patientsContinue reading “What Are the Stages of Grief?”